SupermodelAshleyGrahamsUnpleasantDentalEncounterWithaFrozenCookie

Ashley Graham has a beautiful and valuable smile—an important asset to her bustling career as a plus-size model and television host. But she recently revealed on Instagram a “confrontation” between one of her teeth and a frozen oatmeal cookie. The cookie won.

Holding her hand over her mouth during the video until the last moment, Graham explained how she sneaked a cookie from her mom's freezer and took a bite of the frozen treat. Taking her hand from her mouth, she revealed her broken tooth.

Okay, maybe it wasn't an actual tooth that was broken: the denticle in question appeared to have been previously altered to accommodate a porcelain veneer or crown. But whatever was once there wasn't there anymore.

Although her smile was restored without too much fuss, Graham's experience is still a cautionary tale for anyone with dental work (and kudos to her for being a good sport and sharing it). Although dental work in general is quite durable, it is not immune to damage. Biting down on something hard, even as delicious as one of mom's frozen oatmeal cookies, could run you the risk of popping off a veneer or loosening a crown.

To paraphrase an old saying: Take care of your dental work, and it will take care of you. Don't use your teeth in ways that put your dental work at risk, tempting as it may be given your mouth's mechanical capabilities.

 Even so, it's unwise—both for dental work and for natural teeth—to use your teeth and jaws for tasks like cracking nuts or prying open containers. You should also avoid biting into foods or substances with hard textures like ice or a rock-hard cookie from the freezer, especially if you have veneers or other cosmetic improvements.

It's equally important to clean your mouth daily, and undergo professional cleanings at least twice a year. That might not seem so important at first since disease-causing organisms won't infect your dental work's nonliving materials. But infection can wreak havoc on natural tissues like gums, remaining teeth or underlying bone that together often support dental enhancements. Losing that support could lead to losing your dental work.

And it's always a good idea to have dental work, particularly dentures, checked regularly. Conditions in the mouth can change, sometimes without you noticing them, so periodic examinations by a trained dental provider could prevent or treat a problem before it adversely affects your dental work.

We're glad Ashley Graham's trademark smile wasn't permanently harmed by that frozen cookie, and yours probably wouldn't be either in a similar situation. But don't take any chances, and follow these common sense tips for protecting your dental work.

If you would like more information on care and maintenance of cosmetic dental work, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Veneers: Strength & Beauty as Never Before” and “Dental Implant Maintenance.”

By Mississauga Dental Arts
September 03, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
DentalImplantsCouldHelpPreserveBoneAfterToothLoss

Losing teeth can make it more difficult to eat, not to mention the effect it can have on your smile. But that could be just the beginning of your problems. Missing teeth can contribute to extensive bone loss within your jaws and face. Here's why.

Bone is like any other living tissue—cells develop, function and eventually die, and new cells take their place. Forces generated during chewing stimulate this new growth, helping the jawbone maintain its normal volume and density.

But you lose this stimulus when you lose teeth. This can cause a slowdown in bone cell regrowth that can eventually diminish bone volume. And it can happen relatively quickly: you could lose a quarter or more of jawbone width around a missing tooth within a year.

As this loss continues, especially in cases of multiple missing teeth, the bone can eventually erode to its base level. This loss of dental function can make chewing more difficult, place more pressure on the remaining teeth and adversely affect facial appearance. It could also prevent an implant restoration to replace missing teeth.

Dentures and other forms of dental restoration can replace missing teeth, but not the chewing stimulus. Dentures in particular will accelerate bone loss, because they can irritate the bony gum ridges they rest upon.

Dental implants, on the other hand, can slow or even stop bone loss. Implants consist of a metal post, typically made of titanium, imbedded into the jawbone at the site of the missing tooth with a life-like crown attached. Titanium also has a strong affinity with bone so that bone cells naturally grow and adhere to the implant's surface. This can produce enough growth to slow, stop or even reverse bone loss.

This effect may also work when implants are combined with other restorations, including dentures. These enhanced dentures no longer rest on the gums, but connect to implants. This adds support and takes the pressure off of the bony ridge, as well as contributes to better bone health.

If you've lost a tooth, it's important to either replace it promptly or have a bone graft installed to help forestall any bone loss in the interim. And when it's time to replace those missing teeth, dental implants could provide you not only a life-like solution, but a way to protect your bone health.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth.”

gum health affects body health dentist mississauga

 

Gum disease is a broad umbrella term used to describe various issues with the gums and supporting structures of the teeth, such as the bone and ligaments. Gum disease first begins when bacteria, known as plaque, builds upon the teeth surfaces and is not adequately cleaned away regularly. When plaque is left to develop, the gums become puffy and red, called gingivitis.

 

If gingivitis is left to develop, it can turn into a more severe form of gum disease called periodontitis, an infection of the gums, bone and ligaments. Some form of gum disease is found in upwards of half the population. New research has proven that there is a link between gum disease and specific health conditions such as pneumonia, Alzheimer's disease and cancer. 

 

Brain Health 

One study followed 597 men over 32 years and found that the more teeth lost to gum disease, the higher the risk of cognitive decline. Gum disease has also been linked to Alzheimer's disease. Researchers have noted that the production of a specific type of bacteria found with gum disease aids in boosting a certain kind of protein in the brain linked to Alzheimer's. 

 

Heart Health 

Researchers are trying to understand the correlation between oral health and heart health. It may be due to inflammation, which is a prominent symptom of gum disease. Chronic inflammation can lead to tissue and organ damage, and this effect may be started by gum inflammation. Alternatively, the connection may be due to bacteria. Bacteria in the gums can enter the bloodstream and travel to the heart. 

 

Cancer Risk 

There seems to be a link between gum disease and overall cancer risk, and several studies have been completed on the matter. One of the more prominent cancers is pancreatic cancer. This may be due to an enzyme produced with gum disease that is also found in gastrointestinal tumours. 

 

Lung Health 

There's a significant relationship between gum disease and respiratory health issues. One connection is due to inflammation. Inflammation causes restriction of the air through the lungs and leads to breathing problems. In addition, oral bacteria in the mouth can be inhaled and lead to respiratory infection and even pneumonia. There's also a connection between gum disease and a higher risk of lung cancer. 

 

Oral health has a connection to overall health. Maintain your oral health by brushing at least once a day and flossing at least daily, and having regular dental check-ups and cleanings. Call us today to schedule your dental visit.





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Mississauga Dental Arts

(905) 286-1569

Mississauga, ON Dentist
Mississauga Dental Arts
350 Burnhamthorpe Road East #2
Mississauga, ON L5A 3S5
(905) 286-1569